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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7
CSPAN
Dec 13, 2012 8:00pm EST
forward. they are fundamental in the long run for russia's development. these are fund the mission of -- fundamental issues that relate to each one of us. over the first 12 years we have -- [inaudible] it was a very important speech. now we need to set up a wealthy russia. and i want you all to understand that the next two years will be extremely important, not only to us but actually for the whole world. the world is entering a new stage of cardinal genius perhaps of up evils. global development is uneven around as new conflicts emerge. there is a competition for resources and i can assure you colleagues, it's not only competition for metal and resources but. [inaudible] will become outsiders and it depends on the will of every nation. capabilities to move on in developing countries. their populations are accustomed to growing living standards and new opportunities. in order to provide sustainable -- we need to achieve a new technological order. this is where many parts of the world have problems. it will become an outsider as the share of the global pie and its businesses and its
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2012 8:00pm EST
. >> thank you. the senate just approved a trading relationship with russia, a vote on my behave and others saying we would like a better relationship with the russian people and the russian government. this is an opportunity for russia so show that vote was justifieded, and an opportunity for russia to show the international community at large that you can be a constructive force in great time of need and a great kate as a nation to do good. i find it ironic, and the red line here literally is red. the line we're crossing is 40,000 people have died. what bothers me the most is we are all on the on the mitt of killing, not the killing i.t. itself. we have to get involved age stop this before it's out of hand. what are we talking about? we want to shape what happens after assad leaves. america not being involved in this constructive way will be hard to go to the libyan -- excuse me, the syria people when they achieve freedom say we want to help you, and they will say, how are y'all? you did little in the time of need. we have a chance in the late hours of the fight to correct that i'll prese
CSPAN
Dec 17, 2012 8:30pm EST
not stand the wake of the soviet union. there was a movement in russia to and secrecy and to discuss the past openly. this was an authentic movement on the ground up and people at the top sympathize with it. the archives began to open in the '90s and were in some ways extraordinarily accessible working with western scholars. there are many instances of that. i did begin to have the impression pours into the '90s, i began to have the impression that one of the other reasons why they were open was because the russians were so preoccupied with other things at that time that they didn't really care. people have often said to me how as a young american, an american woman how cute you be wondering around those archives? i think the attitude was, she wants to look at old documents, so what? what? we are busy proof reforming our economy. what happened is putin became president of russia and he had a much more instrumental idea of what it was for anti-read politicized history and began to become much more conscious overworked history was told and how it was being told. this really trickles do
CSPAN
Dec 18, 2012 8:00pm EST
was so touched he received a bundle of letters from school children in russia and it reminded me there was an incident in russia where a gunman went into a schoolhouse and killed children, and the monsignor was so touched by it. that's the way this event has touched the world. i will tell you that this is a strong town, and you can feel the people of this community pulling together to support the survivors, and thinking about how they can rebuild the town and its spirit. one woman said so poignantly the other night at the interfaith sergeant, we will not allow this devent to define newtown, connecticut, and they will not -- the families of those who lost loved ones have been changed forever. and in that regard i particularly want to thank my colleagues for this resolution of condolence and support. i want to thank my league, senator reid, for the moment of silence yesterday in this chamber. in my faith's tradition, when you visit the house of mourning, one of the customs is for the visitor to sit silently with the mourners, and it's very awkward. it's actually not the natural thi
CSPAN
Dec 20, 2012 8:00pm EST
to the state department and ambassador to india, russia, israel, and other important nations. admiral mullen, as we know, chairman of the joint chiefs of staff. i think that their backgrounds, their service to the country showed up starkly in the quality of the boards report, and i want to thank them for their extraordinary service to our country and i want to thank secretary clinton who appointed them, who selected them. the report pulls no punches. it tackles head on many of the questions we've been asking. the report makes 29 recommendations in total, five of which are classified. secretary clinton has embraced every single one of them, in fact, she's gone above and beyond board's recommendations by taking immediate steps to strengthen security at high threat posts and request from congress the authority to reprogram funds to increase diplomatic security spending by $1.3 billion. you know, in washington where too often we see recommendations of blue ribbon panels ignored, delayed, or deferred as they were for a long time even on the 9/11 commission, i think the secretary's swift action un
CSPAN
Dec 19, 2012 8:00pm EST
, russia, israel, jordan, other places. and he served as undersecretary of political affairs. ambassador -- admiral mullen was chairman of the joint chiefs of staff and had been extraordinarily distinguished career in the united states navy. these are two men who didn't mince any words. they didn't hedge. there was candid and direct and i think this report is a quality report. the state department can take pride in it. the country is well served for the process put in place. secretary clinton said she would do this in david e. completely unfurnished appraisal and that's exactly what it is and i think she and the administration deserve credit for doing what was required here and really going to great lengths to make this sure is a very professional presentation. so tomorrow we will hear from the department on how they are proceeding forward. but i think the most important step is the report itself in the presentation later today. >> what administrative actions are taken inside the state department as a >> what administrative actions are taken inside the state department as a result of thi
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 8:00pm EST
back -- so it's a vast multitude on the planet but no self-government in russia, and china and india and africa, most of europe. you look back through the previous millennia and you have democracy and self-government existing in very few tiny city states, athens because they can't defend themselves militarily and even when it did exist people would speak the same language and worship the same god, the same climate and culture, a very small little area. that is all of world history. and you look today, democracy is half the planet. if you asked me what changed, what was the hinge of all of that i think i would say the word we the people. 225 years ago the hinge of world history because all of the conclusions at the time it was way better and more perfect and for the first time ever in the history of the planet, an entire continent got to vote on how they and their posterity would be, and there were lots of exclusions from our perspective that we wouldn't exist as a democratic country in the democratic world but for that. i would say it's the hinge of all modern history. before democra
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7